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Welcome to EasyAsEKG.com

Welcome to Easy As EKG.  This is an informative website that will help you learn how to read and interpret EKG’s.  In no way will this be a training that will make you an expert in reading EKG’s; but rather we just want to get your feet wet and introduce EKG interpretation for beginners.

I hope the information is informative and will help you get the basics down.  This is 100% FREE EKG training so enjoy the content and what we have to offer.

(now the disclaimer)- The content on this website is for information only.  In no way are we providing medical advice, nor are we providing medical training.  There are college courses on EKG interpretation and if you are looking to get certified or as a profession I highly recommend you seek professional training.

Phew!  Not that we have that out of the way, browse through the website and take a look around.  I must say that the heart is an amazing organ, see how it works!

Enjoy!

Review The Coronary Circulation

The Anatomy of Coronary Circulation

The Anatomy of Coronary Circulation

As we showed you earlier this is the coronary circulatory system.  You can better see now how this would rate to infarcts in certain areas.

For example, what is known as “the widow maker” is the left coronary artery.  The reason it is called such is because it is blood supply for such a huge part of the left heart. If this becomes occluded, the heart tissue in that area will die.  If that happens the pumping factor for the heart becomes zero!  Thus causing instant cardiac arrest.

Grouping Leads on a 12 Lead EKG- Where They Represent

EKG Leads and Where they represent

EKG Leads and Where they represent\

You can understand a lot better when you can view the leads and the locations they represent.  If you look above, you will notice that anterior leads and septal leads are so close, often you will get injury patterns in both.

Here is another way to understand 12 lead placement and their respective location on the heart.

Understanding Heart Anatomy as it relates to the 12 Lead EKG

Understanding Heart Anatomy as it relates to the 12 Lead EKG

Grouping Leads on a 12 Lead EKG- What they mean!

Grouping Leads on a 12 Lead EKG

Grouping Leads on a 12 Lead EKG

You will notice that when looking at an EKG, Grouping leads together represent an area of the hear.

Leads 2, 3 and AVF represent the inferior leads.  The was I remember is by a boot shape on the bottom left.  So if I see ST elevations in the boot, i know there is an injury to the inferior leads.

Lateral Leads Represent 1, AVL. V5 and V6.  So if there is elevation to this area I know the lateral wall is affected.  This kinda looks like a gel or jelly that runs across the EKG.

Anterior Leads are going to be V1, V2, V3, and V4.  These actually represent Anteroseptal leads.  You can further break these up to V1 and V2 representing Septal Wall and V3, V4 representing Anterior Wall.

Basic 12 Lead EKG Interpretation

Basic 12 Lead EKG Interpretation

Basic 12 Lead EKG Interpretation

 

The concept of “Grouped Leads” is the basics of understanding the 12-lead EKG.

If you look above, you will notice that in order for there to be an MI, Elevation, or even depression of significant meaning it must be in two contiguous leads.  What the heck does that mean?  Well, take a look in V1.  If you had elevation in Lead V1, one may think that this is indicative of a septal wall infarct.  But it is not!  The only way that could represent an injury to the septal wall is if V2 was also elevated.  So an isolated elevation in V1 would not be as alarming, however, this is something that I would do repeat 12 Leads on.  Especially if the leads are confirmed to be properly placed.

 

 

which relates directly to anatomy

12 Lead Classification

Elements of a 12 Lead EKG

Elements of a 12 Lead EKG

You can see with the exception on the classic limb leads, all leads are unipolar.  Blassic limb leads are bipolar, meaning two polarities, vs. one in unipolar.

Axis Deviation Cheat Sheet

Easy way to learn how to interpret Axis Deviations

Easy way to learn how to interpret Axis Deviations

Leads I and II methods:

Count the number of boxes above and below the isoelectric line to determine if the QRS is more positive or more negative.

 

Note: No man’s land means the area of 180 ~ 90°, it is helpful in determining if a wide-complex tachycardia is ventricular or supraventricular in nature.